I actually remember this day seven years ago. I forced my dad to get up early with me so that I could read The Deathly Hallows for the rest of the day. I didn’t take any brakes, not even for meals.

I pity the people who have never read the series. It truly was a magical experience.

Happy 7th birthday, Deathly Hallows!

(Source: simplypotterheads)

(Reblogged from lostinhogwarts)
pbsthisdayinhistory:

July 21, 1925: Scopes Found Guilty in “Monkey Trial”
On this day in 1925, a Tennessee high school science teacher, John Thomas Scopes, was found guilty for allegedly teaching evolution, which violated Tennessee state law. The Scopes Trial, known as the “Monkey Trial,” lasted only a week, but ignited conversation and debate over whether to teach Creation or Evolution in the classroom. 
The court acquitted Scopes on a technicality but upheld the constitutionality of the state law which was eventually overturned in 1967.
Explore American Experience’s timeline of the Scopes “Monkey” Trial to learn more.
Image:  John Thomas Scopes, Library of Congress.

pbsthisdayinhistory:

July 21, 1925: Scopes Found Guilty in “Monkey Trial”

On this day in 1925, a Tennessee high school science teacher, John Thomas Scopes, was found guilty for allegedly teaching evolution, which violated Tennessee state law. The Scopes Trial, known as the “Monkey Trial,” lasted only a week, but ignited conversation and debate over whether to teach Creation or Evolution in the classroom.

The court acquitted Scopes on a technicality but upheld the constitutionality of the state law which was eventually overturned in 1967.

Explore American Experience’s timeline of the Scopes “Monkey” Trial to learn more.

Image:  John Thomas Scopes, Library of Congress.

(Reblogged from pbsthisdayinhistory)
(Reblogged from climateadaptation)

thepoliticalnotebook:

2014’s World Cup may be only just over, but the politics of the 2018 World Cup are already a subject of discussion. Over at The Daily Beast, Tunku Varadarajan suggests that a genuine way to punish Vladimir Putin for MH17 (and whatever else) would be to take the World Cup away from Russia. 

How does one punish the autocratic, omnipotent president of a quasi-superpower? It is much harder to do so than to spank the piddling ruler of a smallish rogue state, but options exist. Putin believes that a World Cup in Russia can be sold to his people as an endorsement of his rule. Why should the world become an accomplice in a dictator’s Ponzi scheme of pride? As he preened for the cameras at the World Cup finalin Rio de Janeiro on July 13, it was clear that Putin regards Russia’s staging of the cup’s next edition asa propaganda godsend, a global vote for his achievements. Imagine his consternation if he were prevented from putting on such a show. 

Not that the original choice to award Russia the 2018 slot (or Qatar the 2022) wasn’t already widely criticized based on allegations of kickbacks and vote-buying.

Photo via Getty.

(Reblogged from thepoliticalnotebook)

fotojournalismus:

Thousands flee Gaza’s Shujaiyah after night of terror | July 20, 2014

They walked in their thousands, barefoot and in their pyjamas, streaming out of the eastern Gaza district of Shujaiyah after a night of non-stop Israeli bombing.

They described hours of terror, as tank shells slammed into homes, with no electricity and no way to escape.They called ambulances, but there was no way for the vehicles to get in under the constant fire.

So in the end, thousands of desperate residents fled on foot at first light, walking two hours or more into Gaza City. They left behind the bodies of the dead in the streets of their neighbourhoods — in Nazzaz, in Shaaf and in other parts of this flashpoint area between Gaza City and the Israeli border.

One of those fleeing was Sabreen Hattad, 34, with her three children. “The Israeli shells were hitting the house. We stayed the night because we were so scared but about six in the morning we decided to escape,” she said. “But where are we supposed to go? The ambulances could not enter and so we ran under shell fire.” Three other men pass by in a hurry clutching bedding in their arms. Asked what they had seen they would only answer: “Death and horror.”

Many of those escaping Shujaiyah made for Gaza’s central Shifa hospital, which was engulfed by chaotic scenes and ambulances ferrying the dead came in a steady steam, among them a local TV cameraman Khaled Hamad and paramedic Fuad Jabir, killed during the overnight offensive, wheeled out wrapped in a bloody plastic shroud. "He wasn’t a fighter, he was a fighter for humanity," wailed one relative as the family buried him. ”He was an ambulance worker, did he deserve to die?” 

Shifa hospital administrator Dr. Hasan Khalas confirmed that 112 Palestinians were killed across Gaza last night, at least 60 dead in Shujaiyah only. Dozens of victims in Shujaiyah haven’t been identified. ”This is the worst I’ve ever seen it,” said Doctor Said Hassan, who has worked at the hospital for eight years.

More than 60 Palestinians were killed, including 17 children, and 210 injured in Shujaiyah massacre so far. The ongoing Israeli military attacks on the Gaza Strip have so far displaced more than 135,000 Palestinians, according to a report. The death toll is expected to rise as Israeli shelling continues and more bodies are uncovered, while today’s total across the Gaza Strip has passed 90 already, bringing the 13-day total death toll to more than 410, with at least 3,000 injured.

Photos:

1. Smoke rises during what witnesses said were heavy Israeli shelling at the Shujaiyah neighbourhood. (Mohammed Salem/Reuters)

2. A wounded Palestinian man reacts after the death of his relatives, who medics said were killed during heavy Israeli shelling at the Shujaiyah district, at a hospital. (Suhaib Salem/Reuters)

3. A Palestinian woman wearing clothes stained with the blood of other relatives, who medics said were wounded in Israeli shelling, cries at a hospital. (Mohammed Salem/Reuters)

4. Palestinians flee the Shujaiyah neighbourhood. (Finbarr O’Reilly/Reuters)

5. A Palestinian woman reacts after the death of her relatives, who medics said were killed during heavy Israeli shelling at the Shujaiyah district, at a hospital. (Suhaib Salem/Reuters)

6. Palestinians flee the Shujaiyah neighbourhood. (Finbarr O’Reilly/Reuters)

7. A Palestinian woman, who medics said was wounded during heavy Israeli shelling, stands at a hospital. (Mohammed Salem/Reuters)

8. Palestinians flee the Shujaiyah neighbourhood. (Finbarr O’Reilly/Reuters)

9. Palestinian policemen and medics carry a man, who medics said was wounded in Israeli shelling, at a hospital. (Suhaib Salem/Reuters)

10. Palestinians flee the Shujaiyah neighbourhood. (Finbarr O’Reilly/Reuters)

(Reblogged from humanrightswatch)

scienceyoucanlove:

Why do we have blood types?

More than a century after their discovery, we still don’t really know what blood types are for. Do they really matter? Carl Zimmer investigates.

15 July 2014

When my parents informed me that my blood type was A+, I felt a strange sense of pride. If A+ was the top grade in school, then surely A+ was also the most excellent of blood types – a biological mark of distinction.

It didn’t take long for me to recognise just how silly that feeling was and tamp it down. But I didn’t learn much more about what it really meant to have type A+ blood. By the time I was an adult, all I really knew was that if I should end up in a hospital in need of blood, the doctors there would need to make sure they transfused me with a suitable type.

And yet there remained some nagging questions. Why do 40 per cent of Caucasians have type A blood, while only 27 per cent of Asians do? Where do different blood types come from, and what do they do? To get some answers, I went to the experts – to haematologists, geneticists, evolutionary biologists, virologists and nutrition scientists.

In 1900 the Austrian physician Karl Landsteiner first discovered blood types, winning the Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine for his research in 1930. Since then scientists have developed ever more powerful tools for probing the biology of blood types. They’ve found some intriguing clues about them – tracing their deep ancestry, for example, and detecting influences of blood types on our health. And yet I found that in many ways blood types remain strangely mysterious. Scientists have yet to come up with a good explanation for their very existence.

“Isn’t it amazing?” says Ajit Varki, a biologist at the University of California, San Diego. “Almost a hundred years after the Nobel Prize was awarded for this discovery, we still don’t know exactly what they’re for.” 

My knowledge that I’m type A comes to me thanks to one of the greatest discoveries in the history of medicine. Because doctors are aware of blood types, they can save lives by transfusing blood into patients. But for most of history, the notion of putting blood from one person into another was a feverish dream.

Renaissance doctors mused about what would happen if they put blood into the veins of their patients. Some thought that it could be a treatment for all manner of ailments, even insanity. Finally, in the 1600s, a few doctors tested out the idea, with disastrous results. A French doctor injected calf’s blood into a madman, who promptly started to sweat and vomit and produce urine the colour of chimney soot. After another transfusion the man died.

Such calamities gave transfusions a bad reputation for 150 years. Even in the 19th century only a few doctors dared try out the procedure. One of them was a British physician named James Blundell. Like other physicians of his day, he watched many of his female patients die from bleeding during childbirth. After the death of one patient in 1817, he found he couldn’t resign himself to the way things were.

“I could not forbear considering, that the patient might very probably have been saved by transfusion,” he later wrote.

Blundell became convinced that the earlier disasters with blood transfusions had come about thanks to one fundamental error: transfusing “the blood of the brute”, as he put it. Doctors shouldn’t transfer blood between species, he concluded, because “the different kinds of blood differ very importantly from each other”.

Human patients should only get human blood, Blundell decided. But no one had ever tried to perform such a transfusion. Blundell set about doing so by designing a system of funnels and syringes and tubes that could channel blood from a donor to an ailing patient. After testing the apparatus out on dogs, Blundell was summoned to the bed of a man who was bleeding to death. “Transfusion alone could give him a chance of life,” he wrote.

Several donors provided Blundell with 14 ounces of blood, which he injected into the man’s arm. After the procedure the patient told Blundell that he felt better – “less fainty” – but two days later he died.

Still, the experience convinced Blundell that blood transfusion would be a huge benefit to mankind, and he continued to pour blood into desperate patients in the following years. All told, he performed ten blood transfusions. Only four patients survived.

While some other doctors experimented with blood transfusion as well, their success rates were also dismal. Various approaches were tried, including attempts in the 1870s to use milk in transfusions (which were, unsurprisingly, fruitless and dangerous).

read the full article here

(Reblogged from scienceyoucanlove)

scienceyoucanlove:

Evolution is awesome!  A native group of people living on the Soloman Islands northeast of Australia called Melanesians is famous for their beautiful dark skin and naturally blonde hair. 

The odd combination has got scientists wondering about how such a color combo develops over time. According to the Global Financial Newswires, many scientists have long thought that their blonde hair was a result of a diet high in fish, perhaps bleaching by the sun and salt water, or a reminder of the island’s historic relations with people of European descent.

In fact, the blonde Melanesians have blonde that is unique solely to them. According to the study in which scientists compared 43 blonde hair islanders to 42 dark hair islanders, blonde Melanesians have a variant of a native gene called TYRP1 that plays an important role in the melanin biosynthetic pathway. This variant is completely separate from what causes blonde hair in Europeans, and doesn’t even exist in the European genetic set.

What’s truly beautiful in this fascinating discovery, as so perfectly stated by the study author Sean Myles, a geneticist at Nova Scotia Agricultural College, is that “it’s a great example of convergent evolution, where the same outcome is brought about by completely different means.”

Found on http://tinyurl.com/6u8kwhl

source 

(Reblogged from scienceyoucanlove)
Last night just before 9pm, they sent us a warning over the phone that ‘We will bomb the hospital, so you need to evacuate. We insisted that we cannot leave the hospital. Our patients are, all of them, paralyzed, they’re unconscious. They’re unable to move, so we need to stay in this hospital…

But just few minutes after the call, shells start falling down on the hospital — the fourth floor, third floor, second floor. Smoke, fire, dust all over.
Basman Alashi, executive director of Al-Wafa Hospital, the only rehabilitation hospital in Gaza and the West Bank. (via thepeoplesrecord)
(Reblogged from humanrightswatch)
fudgeflies:

This is pretty much how I sum up Snape apologists.


Snape apologists suck.

fudgeflies:

This is pretty much how I sum up Snape apologists.

Snape apologists suck.

(Source: debarbarac)

(Reblogged from caitlinfaith)
Played 8,875 times

rubdown:

rise above, gonna start the war
oh, what you want, what you need, what’d you come here for?
well, an eye for an eye and an ‘f’ for fight
they’re taking me down as the prisoners riot

(Reblogged from rhymeswithellen)

mapsontheweb:

Map of proposal to divide California into six states.

Six Californias is a proposed initiative to split the U.S. state of California into six states. It is proposed as a California ballot measure for the 2016 state elections. Venture capitalist Tim Draper launched the measure in December 2013. If the measure passes, it does not legally split California immediately; consent would eventually need to be given by both the California State Legislature and the U.S. Congress to admit the new states to the union per Article IV, Section 3 of the U.S. Constitution. Rather, the measure establishes several procedures within the state government and its 58 counties that prepare California for the proposed split, and then instructs the Governor of California to submit the state-splitting proposal to Congress.

What bullshit. We already have a serious water policy and infrastructure problem, and if California is split up, SoCal is on its own for obtaining water.

(Source: geocurrents.info)

(Reblogged from acodetojoy)
Played 14,787 times

indaymusic:

Firelight | Young The Giant

Lay down by the fire light
For all I know it’s the last time

(Reblogged from rhymeswithellen)
acodetojoy:

Lol, an employee chooses to dress as the boss.

acodetojoy:

Lol, an employee chooses to dress as the boss.

(Source: tastefullyoffensive)

(Reblogged from acodetojoy)

humanoidhistory:

John Oliver’s Last Week Tonight explores the sexxxy love letters of President Warren G. Harding.

(Reblogged from humanoidhistory)