marauders4evr:

J.K. Rowling on Disabilities and Illnesses

(Thank you mischief-managed-7 for the screenshots!)

I’ll be honest. I’m not quite sure what to think. On the one hand, I find myself thinking, ‘Not good enough.’ On the other hand, the information that’s presented is…interesting. I’m not sure how to feel about the fact that Muggle disabilities are immediately cured in the wizarding world. Thoughts?

(Reblogged from acodetojoy)

thepoliticalnotebook:

This Week in War. A Friday round-up of what happened and what’s been written in the world of war and military/security affairs this week. It’s a mix of news reports, policy briefs, blog posts and longform journalism. Subscribe here to receive this round-up by email.

Photo: Soot clouds from heavy Israeli air strikes rise over Gaza City. Tuesday, July 29. Mohammed Saber/EPA.

If you would like to receive this round-up as a weekly email, you can sign up through this form, or email me directly at torierosedeghett@gmail.com.

(Reblogged from thepoliticalnotebook)
musingsofthebigboo:

mapofhyc:

grant, you ignorant slut.

I don’t take the bait anymore, but this guy used to survive off baiting people to argue with him. Glad to see college hasn’t changed him.

Grant said this? Somehow, I’m not surprised. He’s been a lot more vocal on Facebook recently.

musingsofthebigboo:

mapofhyc:

grant, you ignorant slut.

I don’t take the bait anymore, but this guy used to survive off baiting people to argue with him. Glad to see college hasn’t changed him.

Grant said this? Somehow, I’m not surprised. He’s been a lot more vocal on Facebook recently.

(Reblogged from musingsofthebigboo)
(Reblogged from lostinhogwarts)
assholeofday:

John Boehner, Asshole of the Day for July 31, 2014
by TeaPartyCat (Follow @TeaPartyCat)
There’s a crisis at the border. The House GOP has been working on a bill for weeks. But then today they pulled it after it became clear it didn’t have the votes to pass.
And then John Boehner and the leadership released this statement/a>:

This situation shows the intense concern within our conference – and among the American people – about the need to ensure the security of our borders and the president’s refusal to faithfully execute our laws. There are numerous steps the president can and should be taking right now, without the need for congressional action, to secure our borders and ensure these children are returned swiftly and safely to their countries. For the past month, the House has been engaged in intensive efforts to pass legislation that would compel the president to do his job and ensure it can be done as quickly and compassionately as possible. Through an inclusive process, a border bill was built by listening to members and the American people that has the support not just of a majority of the majority in the House, but most of the House Republican Conference. We will continue to work on solutions to the border crisis and other challenges facing our country.

Let me summarize this for you:
Obama can solve this with unilateral action
But we worked on a bill to solve it for a month anyways
We can’t agree on how to solve it
But we still expect Obama to solve it, even though we can’t agree on a plan
We’ll blame him if he doesn’t solve it unilaterally
Oh, and we’re still suing Obama for his unilateral action on Obamacare
See you in 5 weeks after our vacation!
Or more simply you might summarize it as:

We won’t let our vacation get canceled just because 50,000 refugee kids need help. That’s Obama’s problem.

And I’m not exaggerating here. By 3PM congressman had already begun leaving town. The same congressmen who spent yesterday voting on Boehner’s plan to sue the president for taking unilateral action on Obamacare.
So, for suing Obama yesterday for taking unilateral action, and then saying Obama should solve the border crisis through unilateral action today, John Boehner is Asshole of the Day.
It is John Boehner's 11th time as Asshole of the Day.
Full story: Talking Points Memo

assholeofday:

John Boehner, Asshole of the Day for July 31, 2014

by TeaPartyCat ()

There’s a crisis at the border. The House GOP has been working on a bill for weeks. But then today they pulled it after it became clear it didn’t have the votes to pass.

And then John Boehner and the leadership released this statement/a>:

This situation shows the intense concern within our conference – and among the American people – about the need to ensure the security of our borders and the president’s refusal to faithfully execute our laws. There are numerous steps the president can and should be taking right now, without the need for congressional action, to secure our borders and ensure these children are returned swiftly and safely to their countries. For the past month, the House has been engaged in intensive efforts to pass legislation that would compel the president to do his job and ensure it can be done as quickly and compassionately as possible. Through an inclusive process, a border bill was built by listening to members and the American people that has the support not just of a majority of the majority in the House, but most of the House Republican Conference. We will continue to work on solutions to the border crisis and other challenges facing our country.

Let me summarize this for you:

  1. Obama can solve this with unilateral action
  2. But we worked on a bill to solve it for a month anyways
  3. We can’t agree on how to solve it
  4. But we still expect Obama to solve it, even though we can’t agree on a plan
  5. We’ll blame him if he doesn’t solve it unilaterally
  6. Oh, and we’re still suing Obama for his unilateral action on Obamacare
  7. See you in 5 weeks after our vacation!

Or more simply you might summarize it as:

We won’t let our vacation get canceled just because 50,000 refugee kids need help. That’s Obama’s problem.

And I’m not exaggerating here. By 3PM congressman had already begun leaving town. The same congressmen who spent yesterday voting on Boehner’s plan to sue the president for taking unilateral action on Obamacare.

So, for suing Obama yesterday for taking unilateral action, and then saying Obama should solve the border crisis through unilateral action today, John Boehner is Asshole of the Day.

It is John Boehner's 11th time as Asshole of the Day.

Full story: Talking Points Memo

(Reblogged from musingsofthebigboo)

This summer is slowly coming to a close for me, and it’s honestly surprising how much I’ve learned these past few months.

I’m still a bit unsure what I’m going to do after finishing at Berkeley, but I’m glad I have some ideas.

Immigration politics and law, working with refugees, and public health are all areas of interest to me, more so than any other subject. I’ve started looking into law schools and grad schools. Georgetown and Tufts both have excellent joint J.D. and Masters programs (although I’m not sure I can get into either). And I’m definitely taking a year or two off to work in between.

I’ve also learned quite a lot about white-collar crime and criminal prosecution, and that’s also something I wouldn’t mind going into. The thing that’s stopping me from trying to be a District Attorney is the fact that I would be working in a bubble. I want a job that requires global perspectives and connections; I refuse to fall into the trap of being only concerned with the problems in one city or one state or one country. Don’t get me wrong; being a DA for a city is a tough job, but most DAs tend to focus on the issues of their own specific cities. I think we’re entering an era with a whole slew of problems that necessitate international cooperation, and I want to be a part of that.

I wonder, though, if that’s too ambitious of a goal?

fuckyeahhistorycrushes:

John McCain, what happened dude?!

[x]

(Reblogged from fuckyeahhistorycrushes)
(Reblogged from deliaaadoll)

bobbycaputo:

Gaza Artist Turns Israeli Air Strike Smoke into Powerful Sketches

As the world looks on with horror at the growing civilian toll in Gaza, and Hamas and Israel consider the terms of a U.S.-proposed ceasefire, one young Palestinian architect is responding to the crisis through art. Gaza-based Tawfik Gebreel aims to send a message, in the “universal humanitarian language understood by all peoples of the world.” He is using photos of the smoke thrown up by rocket strikes and reworking the images with symbols of hope and unity.

(Reblogged from musingsofthebigboo)

(Source: princesconsuela)

(Reblogged from comethearchers)

damianimated:

We revere the “Renaissance Era: 89-99" of Walt Disney Animation Studios and we’ve dubbed their recent successes “The Golden Age 10-present" but I’m here today to show you what I dub "The Experimental Era 99-09" of the studios. Each on of these violently critiqued and often looked-over films is a charm in its own right and I’m here to tell you why.

1999 - Fantasia 2000 - Fitting enough it starts with a sequel to one of the most experimental animations of all time, Fantasia. This beautiful little continuation is just as charming and unique as the original. If not for the general rejection from audiences a third film had been planned.

2000 - Dinosaur - Experiments with overlaying computer generation with live-action backgrounds. Though often critiqued for its similarity to The Land Before Time (because it was dinosaurs??)

2000 - The Emperor’s New Groove - On top of Dinosaur Disney released a second film, which was one of the first “cartoony” Disney films that focussed on a lot of traditional comic antics but beyond that it created a humorous film about class and understanding.

2001 - Atlantis: The Lost Empire - A film that often felt more aimed at adults than children featured a cast of diverse and interesting characters, including a Russian florist/bomber, a Latina mechanic, a black doctor, an Atlantean princess and several elderly characters that band together for the great of good and to save a dying kingdom from gold diggers.

2002 - Lilo & Stitch - One of the most unique animated Disney films to date, as it showcased the art style of artist Chris Sanders rather than sticking to the “Disney look,” along with beautiful watercolor backgrounds. The comedy was on point as well as an incredibly deep plotline about family and finding where you belong. One of the realest Disney films to date with its inclusion of social services, family death and over-all realistic portrayals of humans and family as well as the lead being a 7-year-old Hawaiian girl put this film as a turning point in the Disney Animation Studios.

2002 - Treasure Planet - The second film of 2002 focussed heavily in the concept of teenage angst and growing up. This film joins Atlantis in Disney’s attempts to create song-less animated Adventure stories.

2003 - Brother Bear - The second Disney film since Pocahontas to find its basis in Native American culture as well as the second since Tarzan to feature songs by Phil Collins. Breathtaking visuals and strong concepts of family and seeing things from someone else’s perspective make this film just as good as the two Renaissance Era it holds similarities with.

2004 - Home on the Range - Not one of Disney’s finest but unique in its plot line being focussed on three female cows and an array of farm animals. Cute and not as bad as its been made-out to be.

2005 - Chicken Little - Their first fully computer-generated film as well as the first to use Disney Digital 3D. It’s cute in its own right but definitely an attempt at getting the hang of CG outside of Pixar. Without Chicken Little we might not have Frozen.

2007 - Meet the Robinsons - The story of an orphaned boy who learns the best thing in life is to “keep moving forward.” Much of the film is based on retro Disney “Tomorrowland” ideas. It’s filled with uniquely designed characters and inspirational messages and is definitely the first CG Disney film to stand out.

2008 - Bolt - The third fully CG film from Disney. Adorable and funny as it follows the stories of three pets, uncovers topics of abandonment and identity crisis’ on a level that children can understand.

2009 - The Princess and the Frog - We close the Disney Experimental Era with the beauty that is The Princess and the Frog. Harkening back to such classic films as Cinderella with as much beauty and grace as Sleeping Beauty, this visual treat is one of Disney’s finest. Beyond that it features a unique soundtrack unlike anything featured in prior Disney musicals, incredibly detailed backgrounds, costume design and an amazing lead character. Not only is Princess Tiana the first Black princess but she is also one of the most realistically written with a dream and a will to make it happen.

And that’s the Walt Disney Animation Studios “Experimental Era.” It deserves far more respect than its been given.

Treasure Planet and Bolt are both among my favorite animated movies of all time. They’re largely underrated.

(Reblogged from rhymeswithellen)

t was only published in English a few weeks ago, but French economist Thomas Piketty’s Capital in the Twenty-First Century has already become inescapable. The reasons start with the confluence of subject matter and author. There’s a lot of interest in economic inequality these days, and research conducted over the past 15 years by Piketty, a professor at the Paris School of Economics, is a big reason why. In the U.S., Piketty and UC Berkeley’s Emmanuel Saez transformed a tame discussion of income quintiles and deciles into a sharp debate about the skyrocketing incomes of the 1% — and the mind-boggling gains of the 0.1% and 0.01%  — by gathering and publishing income tax data that nobody had bothered with before. Piketty was behind similar projects in France, Britain, Japan, and other countries.
And now this book. It is massive (696 pages) and massively ambitious (the title is a very conscious echo of Karl Marx’s Das Kapital). It came out in France last year to great acclaim, which meant that those in the English-speaking world who pay attention to such matters knew that something big was coming. Over the past few weeks it has become one of those things that everybody’s talking about just because everybody’s talking about it. That, and it really is important.

Is it worth reading? Martin Wolf of the Financial Times called it “enthralling”; a couple people I know have described it as “a slog.” I’d liken it to a big river — muddy and occasionally meandering, but with a powerful current that keeps pulling you along, plus lots of interesting sights along the way. There are endless numbers and (ugly but generally understandable) charts, but also frequent references to the novels of Balzac and Austen, and even a brief analysis of Disney’s The Aristocats. Regular people can read this thing; it’s just a matter of the time commitment. You should definitely buy it, if your place on the income distribution allows it. It looks good on a bookshelf, plus every copy sold makes Piketty wealthier, allowing us to discover whether this alters his views about inequality. At the moment those views involve a lot of alarm about the growing income divide and a decided equanimity about raising taxes. Unlike most economists who write for a general audience, though, Piketty makes it quite easy for readers to separate these views from the evidence he assembles. When he writes at the end of the book that “all my conclusions are by nature tenuous and deserve to be questioned and debated,” one gets the feeling that he actually means it.

t was only published in English a few weeks ago, but French economist Thomas Piketty’s Capital in the Twenty-First Century has already become inescapable. The reasons start with the confluence of subject matter and author. There’s a lot of interest in economic inequality these days, and research conducted over the past 15 years by Piketty, a professor at the Paris School of Economics, is a big reason why. In the U.S., Piketty and UC Berkeley’s Emmanuel Saez transformed a tame discussion of income quintiles and deciles into a sharp debate about the skyrocketing incomes of the 1% — and the mind-boggling gains of the 0.1% and 0.01% — by gathering and publishing income tax data that nobody had bothered with before. Piketty was behind similar projects in France, Britain, Japan, and other countries.

And now this book. It is massive (696 pages) and massively ambitious (the title is a very conscious echo of Karl Marx’s Das Kapital). It came out in France last year to great acclaim, which meant that those in the English-speaking world who pay attention to such matters knew that something big was coming. Over the past few weeks it has become one of those things that everybody’s talking about just because everybody’s talking about it. That, and it really is important.

Is it worth reading? Martin Wolf of the Financial Times called it “enthralling”; a couple people I know have described it as “a slog.” I’d liken it to a big river — muddy and occasionally meandering, but with a powerful current that keeps pulling you along, plus lots of interesting sights along the way. There are endless numbers and (ugly but generally understandable) charts, but also frequent references to the novels of Balzac and Austen, and even a brief analysis of Disney’s The Aristocats. Regular people can read this thing; it’s just a matter of the time commitment. You should definitely buy it, if your place on the income distribution allows it. It looks good on a bookshelf, plus every copy sold makes Piketty wealthier, allowing us to discover whether this alters his views about inequality. At the moment those views involve a lot of alarm about the growing income divide and a decided equanimity about raising taxes. Unlike most economists who write for a general audience, though, Piketty makes it quite easy for readers to separate these views from the evidence he assembles. When he writes at the end of the book that “all my conclusions are by nature tenuous and deserve to be questioned and debated,” one gets the feeling that he actually means it.

(Reblogged from acodetojoy)

Anonymous said: In your opinion, what is the most significant event in all of history?

The invention of writing.

(Cleaning out the inbox—sorry for my late replies.)

Anonymous said: Lorde or Lana Del Rey?

I love Lorde’s music, but I’m going with Lana Del Rey on this one. Her music is art—sensual, emotive, and a tad bit overwhelming at times.

Telebears is down and I’m crying in my cubicle at work.

I JUST WANT TO SIGN UP FOR CLASSES. WHY WON’T YOU LET ME??